March-April 2019

1) Plazomicin for complicated UTIs

Given the reputation of being birthplace of some of the superbugs of global concern, India needs to have an ‘antibiotic stewardship’ policy, even better, a law! Crisis is no less urgent than global climate change and melting glaciers. Developing new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of actions is another important although very difficult way out.

Aminoglycosides are effective against many ESBL producing organisms and are often used as an alternative to carbapenems in the treatment of urosepsis. Carbapenem resistance is rising and about 80% of such organisms are also producing ‘amino glycoside modifying enzymes’ limiting our treatment options further. Plazomicin is an aminoglycoside that is engineered to evade modification by aminoglycoside- modifying enzymes, and it maintains activity in the presence of most mechanisms that lead to resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, including mutations in sites targeted by fluoroquinolones and the production of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, extended-spectrum β-lactamases, and carbapenemases.

Here is the EPIC study in NEJM reporting efficacy of once daily plazomicin vs meropenem, for complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs): composite cure (clinical cure and microbiologic eradication) at day 5 [88.0% (168 of 191 patients) in the plazomicin group and in 91.4% (180 of 197 patients) in the meropenem group (–3.4 95% CI –10.0 to 3.1)], and at the test-of-cure visit-15 to 19 days after initiation of therapy-[81.7% (156 of 191 patients) and 70.1% (138 of 197 patients) respectively (11.6 ; 95% CI, 2.7 to 20.3). 

Plazomicin performed better in UTIs by ESBL producers, aminoglycoside resistant organisms and also had higher microbiological cure rates and lower relase rates: these finding can only be hypothesis generating given the “noninferiority”design of the trial. Renal dysfucntion, as expected, was more common with Plazomicin (11 vs 4 patients). As with all antibiotic therapies, local susceptibility patterns and selection pressures make it important to see data in other geographic areas. 

Welcome Plazomicin! 

2) Genetic basis for CKD in adult

While children with CKD are often evaluated with genetic testing, adults typically are not. You may consider expanding genetic evaluation even in adults after reading this clinical investigation in Kidney International. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed in a multi- centre cohort of 114 families including 138 affected individuals with CKD, across nephrology services in Ireland. Pathogenic mutation in known monogenic CKD genes was detected in more than one-third of families. The yield was highest in those with extrarenal features (69%), followed by those with positive family history (36%) and least (15%) in those without either of these. 

Authors hypothesize that later-onset disease is due to allelic heterogeneity, with “milder” phenotypes likely attributable to “milder” missense mutations. 

This exercise is likely to be further more fruitful in populations (like the one we encounter) where aetiology of CKD is uncertain in large majority of young and middle aged adults. Screening for extra renal disease, and potential avoidance of kidney biopsies and donor risk stratification are other proposed advantages of this testing. 

Irish population, higher than usual prevalence of familial CKD and possibility of missing deletion–insertion, copy-number variants, or mutations residing within a promotor or other intronic region (WES doesn’t capture these) are the limitations. Another important issue is the uncerainty about how to deal with the other genetic information that is typically unmasked by WES and this can potentially create anxiety and initiate additional diagnostic workup. Don’t miss this accompanying editorial.

CKDu researcher community can consider incorporating WES along with other evaluations. 

3) Rate of correction of hypernatremia and health outcomes in critically il

Rapid correction of hyponatremia is associated with definite harm. What should be the rate of correction for hypernatremia? We don’t know. “Go-slow- strategy” is extrapolated from the principles of hyponatremia management . Here is a retrospective observational study in CJASN, reporting the association of the rate of hyponatremia correction and outcomes (in hospital mortality and length of hospital stay).

In hospital 30-day mortality in rapid (>0.5 mmol/L per hour) and slower (<0.5 mmol/L per hour) correction rate groups was not significant either in patients with hypernatremia at admission (25% versus 28%; P=0.80) or in patients with hospital acquired hypernatremia (44% vs 40%;P=0.50). There was no difference in aOR of mortality for rapid vs slow correction in either admission (aOR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.5 to 3.7) or hospital-acquired hypernatremia (aOR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.8 to 2.3). 

This is now the largest cohort study addressing the issue of rate of hypernatremia correction, and can reassure us to correct dehydration in these patients (there were no cases of cerebral edema in the 78 patients who had serum sodium correction of 12 mmol/L per day). 

Several important limitations should be noted though: inability to identify exact timing of onset of hyponatremia, exclusion of patients with milder hypernatremia limiting generalisability to patients with serum Na 145-155 (>155 was inclusion criteria), lack of information about etiology, types of fluids used for treatment, reliance on ICD coding and patient chart. 30-40% patients were DNR-highlighting the type of patient population that generally develop severe hyponatremia and outcomes here will be principally driven by underlying illness, with hypernatremia being just a marker of its severity. 

4) Contribution of non-HLA incompatibility to kidney allograft survival: genome-wide analysis study 

Why do half of the renal allografts fail by 15 years post transplant? Chronic antibody mediated graft injury underlies many of the graft losses after initial few years, even in HLA matched individuals, highlighting the importance of non HLA alloimmunity. 
In this prospective genome wide association study involving 477 pairs of deceased donors and recipients, genome wide mismatches in non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNPs) were calculated to identify incompatibilities in transmembrane and secreted proteins. In 25 patients with biopsy-confirmed chronic antibody-mediated rejection, customised peptide arrays were generated to screen for antibodies against genotype-derived mismatched epitopes. 
The degree of nsSNP mismatch was independently associated with graft loss in a multivariable model adjusted for HLA eplet mismatch. Each increase by a unit of one IQR had an HR of 1·68 (95% CI 1·17–2·41, p=0·005). 5-year death censored graft survival was 98% in the quartile with the lowest mismatch, 91% in the second quartile, 89% in the third quartile, and 82% in the highest quartile (p=0·003, log-rank test). 

In the absence of effective therapy, chronic ABMR is almost the point of no return for recipients. Whether immunological risk stratification using non HLA mismatches help prevent this process will be interesting to see. 

5) Low dose daily versus alternate day prednisolone in frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome

Initial strategy for children with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome is to use long term alternate day prednisolone. However, many children do relapse on this regimen.

In a single-centre open-label randomised controlled trial, Yadav et al tested efficacy and safety of 12-month therapy with prednisolone administered daily low-dose versus on alternate days (standard therapy) in 61 patients with FRNS.

Children receiving daily prednisolone had significantly fewer relapses than those on alternate day therapy (0.55 relapses/person-year VS 1.94). Daily therapy was associated with higher rates of sustained remission at six months and lower rates of treatment failure (defined as frequent relapses, steroid toxicity or infections) at six months and one year. The cumulative prednisolone dose was similar in both the groups. Adverse effects were not different in the two groups.
If an adequately powered study confirms this observation, it will strengthen the KDIGO suggestion of using daily prednisolone at the lowest dose where alternate day prednisolone therapy is not effective. 

6) SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists for nephroprotection and cardioprotection in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease

Fellows preparing for their final theory exam, here is a theory long question stuff for you: “Unmet need of Renoprotection addressed by newer antidiabetic drugs”. EUropean REnal and CArdiovascular Medicine (EURECA-m) and Diabesity workgroup of ERA-EDTA summarise the cardioprotective and nephroprotective effects of SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists. You will have to squint to find the limitations of the trials though (reviewed in depth here and here by us before).

Here is a quote from this review: “Although EMPA-REG OUTCOME, CANVAS and DECLARE-TIMI 58 were not studies with primary renal endpoints, an objective (!) reader cannot overlook that a 40–50% reduction in the composite outcome is much larger than relevant reductions in seminal trials in DKD.” Curiously missing mentions about FDA warnings- DKA, foot amputations, genital infections, fractures. Everyone is smitten with SGLT2 inhibitors! 
Let’s wait for CREDENCE.

7) Effects of Hemodiafiltration versus Conventional Hemodialysis in Children with ESKD

Alternative RRT techniques like HDF are looked upon as a hope to improve the dismal long term survival of dialysis patients. RCTs do not show clear survival benefit, however, jury isn’t out yet and HDF is increasingly used (18% of ESRD cases in Europe) for many of its possible benefits.

There is little data on efficacy of HDF in children and this observational study is a important first step. In this prospective cohort study of 190 children from 28 centers, Shroff et al noted that the children on HDF grew better: annualized change in height SD score remained static in HD, but showed a small but statistically significant increase in HDF (Δ=20.16; P=0.02), so that patients on HDF were taller than patients on HD at 12 months (P=0.04).

Carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) is a non-invasive surrogate marker for atherosclerotic changes in the artery. HDF group fared better in terms of cMIT SD score. At 1-year follow-up, the cIMT SD score increased by median 0.41 in the HD group and decreased by 0.07 in the HDF group (P=0.02).

Patient-reported outcomes like post-dialysis recovery time, headaches, dizziness, and cramps favoured HDF group. There was no difference in sleep disturbances, pruritus, or restless leg syndrome between groups. If transplant isn’t an option, children are expected to have maximum dialysis vintage, so may benefit by alternative dialysis therapies. Lets hope to see more data from randomised controlled trials.